JAMES F. REINHARDT PH.D.

-Marine Ecologist-



PUBLICATIONS

I'm glad you are here. Please download and take a look at some of my publications. But please come back, as there are more coming. I have a number of manuscripts accepted or in review (and, hopefully, then accepted). Also, if you feel compelled, send me a note or comment on these papers. I am happy to get feedback. If you have ideas, a desire to learn more, or to collaborate on projects, get in touch.
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Material properties of Didemnum vexillum and prediction of tendril fragmentation

Abstract The colonial tunicate Didemnum vexillum has recently invaded the North American coast and has the potential to cause economic and ecological damage. One potential mechanism for adult D. vexillum colonies to disperse is fragmentation and subsequent reattachment to another substrate. To understand the life history and ecology of D. vexillum and obtain a first-order estimate of dispersal potential via fragmentation, (1) the basic material properties of D. vexillum sampled from two locations in southern New England were measured in two growth forms (2) summer calcium concentration was measured as a proxy for spicule densities; and (3) the environmental stress factor (ESF) of tendrils under various hydrodynamic circumstances (i.e.,water velocities from 0.01 to 20 m s-1) was determined..
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A Phenological Mid-Domain Analysis of Non-Native and Native Species Recruitment Richness


A mid-domain model was used to examine differences in patterns of species recruitment diversity between native and non-native species groups within shallow sub-tidal epifaunal communities of southern New England. A mid-domain model is a stochastic null model that predicts species richness atterns within a bounded domain. Deviations from the mid-domain model were examined to assess: 1) if each species group’s recruitment diversity differed from the mid-domain model; and 2) if there were differences in the patterns of deviation between groups. In general, the shape of mid-domain null was correlated to empirical patterns of recruitment diversity (i.e., mid-summer peaks in recruitment diversity) although among-year variation occurred in both the pattern of recruitment diversity and the level of fit...
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A review of the life history, invasion process, and potential management of Clavelina lepadiformis Müller, 1776: a recent invasion


The colonial tunicate Clavelina lepadiformis is a recent invader to the northwest Atlantic and has the potential to cause ecological and economic harm. This paper provides a review of the biological and ecological characteristics of C. lepadiformis, and hypothesizes the likely mechanisms of introduction, establishment and future expansion. The intent of this paper is to provide a consolidated source of information for marine ecosystem managers and provide a starting point for developing a management strategy, should one be desired. Although C. lepadiformis is not currently a management challenge because of the limited range of the invasion in North America; the similarities between C. lepadiformis and other tunicate invaders, and the proximity of incipient populations to boating, shipping, aquaculture, and energy infrastructure suggest future economic burden of this new invader.
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First record of the non-native light bulb tunicate Clavelina lepadiformis (Müller, 1776) in the northwest Atlantic


We report the first record of the colonial tunicate Clavelina lepadiformis (Müller, 1776) in the northwest Atlantic. Populations were found along the eastern Connecticut shoreline in October 2009. At one site C. lepadiformis had a mean percent cover of 19.95% (±4.16 S.E.). A regional survey suggests that the invasion is relatively localized. Genetic analysis confirms our morphological identification and places the introduced population in the previously described ‘Atlantic clade’. While it appears Clavelina lepadiformis is currently in the incipient stage of introduction in eastern Connecticut waters, its spread to other areas in the region could lead to competition with resident members of shallow water epifaunal assemblages and shellfish species.
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